Hygge: Discovering Denmark

Created By:
Di

 
If someone says "you're heading to the happiest place on earth," I assume, most people picture Disneyland; so, when I was told that exact statement and landed in a country where the temperature is a consistent 30 degrees, the sun is as rare as an eclipse, and the national color is black you can imagine my shock. Yet, my first month in Denmark has proved to be far from a disappointment.

Nyhavn

Nyhavn, København K, Denmark

As a consequence of being a tourist, Nyhavn was inevitably my first (and second) stop the weekend I arrived in Copenhagen. The old sailor village, built in the late 17th century, consists of a number of colorful buildings housing cafes, restaurants, and small shops. Although a bit pricey even for this city, its charm relates to the fact that the view is somewhat out of a fairy-tale; which makes sense considering Hans Christian Anderson actually lived there. Today, you're likely to find an abundance of travelers lounging around the harbor. I recommend visiting once the temperature warms up in order to take advantage of the popular canal tours.

Kastellet: The Citadel

Kastellet (The Citadel), Gl. Hovedvagt, Kastellet, Copenhagen, Denmark

At the center of Copenhagen stands the oldest, best preserved star fortress in Northern Europe. Kastellet, which contains part of the Danish military and the headquarters of the National Guard, is credited for its role in the defense of Denmark. Additionally, a number of historical sights are located within the pentagram, so it serves as a beautiful public park. (Views of the church literally took my breath away)

Royal Danish Navy Joint Operation's Center

Carl Nielsens Vej 6, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark

Despite my study abroad being focused in Copenhagen, the program I am with (DIS) values itself on various opportunities to partake in faculty-led study tours. Students are expected to pick a core course, in addition to a major, and participate in hands-on activities. This past week, which was deemed core course week, I was lucky enough to travel to Aarhus in the Northern area of the country with my humanitarian law class, and get a lecture by one of only seven commanders who run the Danish Navy. Honestly, this has been my greatest experience in Denmark thus far. We were taken to a base located within the woods and behind barbed-wire fences. My teacher, who happens to be heavily involved with the military himself, organized a presentation in which we learned about maritime operations within Danish waterways and got insight on laws pertaining to sovereignty. This was truly a once in a lifetime experience, and although we technically weren't authorized to take pictures I managed to get one of the "instructor." My class also visited Aarhus University, which is the largest school in Denmark, where we were given an amazing talk on the laws of armed conflict by a Lieutenant Colonel who doubles as a professor. Finally, we visited the modern art museum which proves fairly popular among locals and visitors, and I have attached a photo of the class (in the famous rainbow room) so you can see my beautiful face.

 

Nyhavn

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Nyhavn, København K
As a consequence of being a tourist, Nyhavn was inevitably my first (and second) stop the weekend I arrived in Copenhagen. The old sailor village, built in the late 17th century, consists of a number of colorful buildings housing cafes, restaurants, and small shops. Although a bit pricey even for this city, its charm relates to the fact that the view is somewhat out of a fairy-tale; which makes sense considering Hans Christian Anderson actually lived there. Today, you're likely to find an abundance of travelers lounging around the harbor. I recommend visiting once the temperature warms up in order to take advantage of the popular canal tours.
 

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Kastellet: The Citadel

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Kastellet (The Citadel), Gl. Hovedvagt
At the center of Copenhagen stands the oldest, best preserved star fortress in Northern Europe. Kastellet, which contains part of the Danish military and the headquarters of the National Guard, is credited for its role in the defense of Denmark. Additionally, a number of historical sights are located within the pentagram, so it serves as a beautiful public park. (Views of the church literally took my breath away)
 

View on Map

 

Royal Danish Navy Joint Operation's Center

Explore
Carl Nielsens Vej 6, 8000 Aarhus C
Despite my study abroad being focused in Copenhagen, the program I am with (DIS) values itself on various opportunities to partake in faculty-led study tours. Students are expected to pick a core course, in addition to a major, and participate in hands-on activities. This past week, which was deemed core course week, I was lucky enough to travel to Aarhus in the Northern area of the country with my humanitarian law class, and get a lecture by one of only seven commanders who run the Danish Navy. Honestly, this has been my greatest experience in Denmark thus far. We were taken to a base located within the woods and behind barbed-wire fences. My teacher, who happens to be heavily involved with the military himself, organized a presentation in which we learned about maritime operations within Danish waterways and got insight on laws pertaining to sovereignty. This was truly a once in a lifetime experience, and although we technically weren't authorized to take pictures I managed to get one of the "instructor." My class also visited Aarhus University, which is the largest school in Denmark, where we were given an amazing talk on the laws of armed conflict by a Lieutenant Colonel who doubles as a professor. Finally, we visited the modern art museum which proves fairly popular among locals and visitors, and I have attached a photo of the class (in the famous rainbow room) so you can see my beautiful face.
 

View on Map